Transform to Open Science (TOPS) Curriculum Development Team

“Open science  —  opening up the scientific process from idea inception to result — increases access to knowledge and expands opportunities for new voices to participate. Sharing the data, code, and knowledge associated with the scientific process lowers barriers to entry, enables findings to be more easily reproduced, generates new knowledge at scale, and allows and facilitates diverse societal uses.

AGU and NASA have made a commitment to advancing the principles of open science to build a more inclusive and open community at NASA, AGU and beyond. This is a resolution to work towards a more transparent and collaborative scientific progress, opening data and results to the broader public whenever possible, and incentivizing researchers around the globe to do the same.

To help catalyze and support the cultural change necessary for such an opening of scientific knowledge, NASA has launched the Open-Source Science Initiative (OSSI), a long-term commitment to open science. To spark change and inspire open science engagement, OSSI has created the Transform to Open Science (TOPS) mission and declared 2023 as the Year Of Open Science.

A key goal of TOPS is to engage thousands of researchers in open science leading practices.

Launching a program such as TOPS is possible thanks to the open science communities’ work over the last couple of decades. TOPS would like to leverage this work in developing a five-part curriculum on open science.  We seek participation from individuals actively engaging with open science communities, open software and data, and related practices to serve on a TOPS Curriculum Development Team. This will include participation in a series of virtual meetings and sprints this year. For those selected to lead module development, there will also be in-person working sessions at AGU’s headquarters in Washington, DC. AGU, in partnership with NASA and experts in curriculum development, will coordinate this effort.  All content will be openly shared….”

Position Statement on Earth and Space Science Data | AGU

“Earth and space science data are a world heritage, and an essential part of the science ecosystem. All players in the science ecosystem—researchers, repositories, publishers, funders, institutions, etc.—should work to ensure that relevant scientific evidence is processed, shared, and used ethically, and is available, preserved, documented, and fairly credited. To achieve this legacy, all AGU members and stakeholders must have a clear understanding of the culture of responsible research, and take action to support, enable, and nurture that culture.

The Challenge

Preserving data as a world heritage requires a culture of data use, sharing, curation, and attribution that is equitable, accessible, and ethical, all of which are essential for scientific research to be transparent, trusted, and valued. Data and other research artefacts, such as physical samples, software, models, methods, and algorithms, are all part of the science ecosystem and essential for research. Data and other research artefacts must be discoverable, accessible, verifiable, trustworthy, and usable, and those responsible for their acquisition or creation should receive due credit for their contribution to scientific advancement. Trustworthy, robust, verifiable, reproducible, and open science is our responsibility and legacy for future generations. To achieve this legacy, policy makers, AGU members, and other stakeholders must recognize that the science ecosystem should be flexible enough to adapt to a changing landscape of research practices, technology innovation, and demonstrations of impact. They must also have a clear understanding of the culture of responsible research, and take action to support, enable, and nurture that culture. This statement, in alignment with other AGU position statements, helps form the foundation to support data as a world heritage.

The Solution

I. Championing Open and Transparent Data

Robust, verifiable, and reproducible science requires that evidence behind an assertion be accessible for evaluation. Researchers have a responsibility to collect, develop, and share this evidence in an ethical manner, that is as open and transparent as possible. Most Earth and space science data can and should be openly available except in cases where human subjects are involved, where other legal restrictions apply, or where data release could cause harm, (e.g. where data could lead to identification of specific people, or could publicly reveal locations of endangered species). Even where data are not publicly available, transparency of collection and processing methods, data quality, inherent assumptions, and known sources of bias is essential. Building transparency and ethical behavior into the entire science ecosystem, even as technology and scientific practice evolves, is a vital component of responsible research.

Data and other research artefacts are useful to the broader scientific community only insofar as they can be shared, examined, and reused. Working within discipline communities to develop, share, and adopt best practices, standards, clear documentation and appropriate licensing will facilitate sharing and interoperability. …

Statement adopted by the American Geophysical Union 29 May 1997; Reaffirmed May 2001, May 2005, May 2006; Revised and Reaffirmed May 2009, February 2012, September 2015; November 2019.”

Generalist Repository Comparison Chart

“This chart is designed to assist researchers in finding a generalist repository should no domain repository be available to preserve their research data. Generalist repositories accept data regardless of data type, format, content, or disciplinary focus. For this chart, we included a repository available to all researchers specific to clinical trials (Vivli) to bring awareness to those in this field.” Undated.

Data and Software for Authors | AGU

“AGU requires that the underlying data needed to understand, evaluate, and build upon the reported research be available at the time of peer review and publication. Additionally, authors should make available software that has a significant impact on the research. This entails:

Depositing the data and software in a community accepted, trusted repository, as appropriate, and preferably with a DOI
Including an Availability Statement as a separate paragraph in the Open Research section explaining to the reader where and how to access the data and software
And including citation(s) to the deposited data and software, in the Reference Section….”

Open Science Pathways in the Earth, Space, and Life Sciences – A joint event co-organized by SciLifeLab and the AGU | AGU Data Leadership

“SciLifeLab Data Centre and the American Geophysical Union (AGU) invite you to a half-day event on 2022 May 9 focusing on the following Open Science themes:

The Path to Open, Reproducible Science – Stories from the Research Community
How to Open Science – Practical Use Cases, Lessons Learned from the Research Community
Open Science from a Broader Context – What Open Science Means from the National and International Perspectives

The event will feature a number of speakers (listed below) all addressing these themes on Open Science from various perspectives. The online event will start at 12:00 and end at 17:00 CEST (See date/time in your time zone). Please join us. Registration is free. Please join us and we look forward to seeing you….”