Testing the Finch Hypothesis on Green OA Mandate Effectiveness

We have now tested the Finch Committee‘s Hypothesis that Green Open Access Mandates are ineffective in generating deposits in institutional repositories. With data from ROARMAP on institutional Green OA mandates and data from ROAR on institutional repositories, we show that deposit number and rate is significantly correlated with mandate strength (classified as 1-12): The stronger the mandate, the more the deposits. The strongest mandates generate deposit rates of 70%+ within 2 years of adoption, compared to the un-mandated deposit rate of 20%. The effect is already detectable at the national level, where the UK, which has the largest proportion of Green OA mandates, has a national OA rate of 35%, compared to the global baseline of 25%. The conclusion is that, contrary to the Finch Hypothesis, Green Open Access Mandates do have a major effect, and the stronger the mandate, the stronger the effect (the Liege ID/OA mandate, linked to research performance evaluation, being the strongest mandate model). RCUK (as well as all universities, research institutions and research funders worldwide) would be well advised to adopt the strongest Green OA mandates and to integrate institutional and funder mandates.

Gargouri, Yassine, Lariviere, Vincent, Gingras, Yves, Brody, Tim, Carr, Les and Harnad, Stevan (2012) Testing the Finch Hypothesis on Green OA Mandate Effectiveness Open Access Week 2012

Testing the Finch Hypothesis on Green OA Mandate Ineffectiveness

We have now tested the Finch Committee‘s Hypothesis that Green Open Access Mandates are ineffective in generating deposits in institutional repositories. With data from ROARMAP on institutional Green OA mandates and data from ROAR on institutional repositories, we show that deposit number and rate is significantly correlated with mandate strength (classified as 1-12): The stronger the mandate, the more the deposits. The strongest mandates generate deposit rates of 70%+ within 2 years of adoption, compared to the un-mandated deposit rate of 20%. The effect is already detectable at the national level, where the UK, which has the largest proportion of Green OA mandates, has a national OA rate of 35%, compared to the global baseline of 25%. The conclusion is that, contrary to the Finch Hypothesis, Green Open Access Mandates do have a major effect, and the stronger the mandate, the stronger the effect (the Liege ID/OA mandate, linked to research performance evaluation, being the strongest mandate model). RCUK (as well as all universities, research institutions and research funders worldwide) would be well advised to adopt the strongest Green OA mandates and to integrate institutional and funder mandates.

Gargouri Y, Lariviere V, Gingras Y, Brody T, Carr L & Harnad S (2012) Testing the Finch Hypothesis on Green OA Mandate Ineffectiveness Open Access Week 2012

Open Access: a profitable choice for publishers

SEEd is an Italian medical publishing house, founded in 2000 and based in Turin. SEEd publishes an extensive range of medical books, multimedia tools, and biomedical journals dedicated to the retraining of doctors and other health professionals (http://www.edizioniseed.it/).

In 2010 the publisher, Simone Eandi, decided to start a new journal, Reviews in Health Care (http://journals.edizioniseed.it/index.php/rhc), and from the beginning it was in Open Access format.

Today the journal counts about 2,500 readers and, for each article, a mean of 50 downloads and 450 online visualisations.

The journal is now indexed on the major open access dbases like DOAJ, NewJour, GoogleScholar and many others.

During the 2012 Farmeconomia and Therapeutic Pathways, the “historical” journal of SEEd, established in 2000, is converted to the Open Access model (http://journals.edizioniseed.it/index.php/FE/). Also in this case we have positive results in terms of visibility: in a few months the number of readers has risen to about a thousand and for each article the mean download is about 30, with 150 online visualisations.

These two experiences are definitely positives, so we decide to transfer all our journals to the Open Access model by the middle of the 2013.

Free access to the journals’ contents in Open Access model is a good opportunity to raise the visibility of the publisher, in particular for:

  • Increasing the number of visits on SEEd official web site
  • Increasing the attractiveness of other SEEd products, also the traditional ones like printed books
  • Attracting a greater number of authors, even from abroad
  • A growth of the submissions
  • Possibility to index the journals and receiving the Impact Factor
  • More interest by the sponsors in buying reprints, supplements and monographs.

 

SEEd business model do not consider the payment of any charge by the authors. The system is sustainable due to higher revenues from the increased visibility of the products distributed according to the traditional channels.

The adopted license, Creative Commons BY, allows to reuse the published material in different ways, so that the publisher can design innovative services like on demand distribution and aggregation of different contents.

[Press release, Turin, October 25th]

R2RC Partners with PhD Comics for Open Access Week Video!

It’s already been such a lively, interactive, and productive Open Access Week 2012. And now the Right to Research Coalition just launched an amazing video in collaboration with PhD Comics to really wrap up the week nicely. The video entitled “Open Access Explained!” is the perfect resource to give colleagues a quick glimpse into the many reasons why Open Access to research is important for students, researchers, and so many other stakeholders. 

Please take a look, pass around, use in your remaining OA Week events, and post.

Happy OA Week to you and yours. We hope to have an informational wrap up of the many events that took place (and continue to take place) this week! Speaking of which don’t forget to keep the posts of your events up to date on our OA Week Website.

 

Open access: everyone has the right to knowledge

Hot off the press today:

Open access: everyone has the right to knowledge: https://theconversation.edu.au/open-access-everyone-has-the-right-to-knowledge-10342

Hope you enjoy, feel free to share. Great to link with you all via twitter also: @sandrodemaio

Sandro

Dr. Alessandro R Demaio MBBS MPH
PhD Fellow in Global Health (Non-Communicable Diseases)
Global Steering Committee, YP-CDN/NCD Action
Copenhagen School of Global Health
University of Copenhagen

Tw @sandrodemaio | sandrodemaio.com

Dans les champs de l’observation, le hasard ne favorise que les esprits préparés
http://au.linkedin.com/in/sandrodemaio

R2RC Partners with PhD Comics for Open Access Week Video!

To close Open Access Week 2012, we’re excited to announce our video collaboration with PhD Comics to produce “Open Access Explained!”.   The comic-style animated video is a great resource to explain the basics of Open Access and why it’s important to friends, family, and colleagues.  Take a look, and help us spread the word about Open Access throughout the research community and to the public at large!
 

R2RC Partners with PhD Comics for Open Access Week Video!

To close Open Access Week 2012, we’re excited to announce our video collaboration with PhD Comics to produce “Open Access Explained!”.   The comic-style animated video is a great resource to explain the basics of Open Access and why it’s important to friends, family, and colleagues. Take a look, and help us spread the word about Open Access throughout the research community and to the public at large! 

R2RC Partners with PhD Comics for Open Access Week Video!

To close Open Access Week 2012, we’re excited to announce our video collaboration with PhD Comics to produce “Open Access Explained!”.   The comic-style animated video is a great resource to explain the basics of Open Access and why it’s important to friends, family, and colleagues. Take a look, and help us spread the word about Open Access throughout the research community and to the public at large! 

What Authors Want From Open Access Publishing

John Wiley & Sons, Inc., today announced the results of an author survey on open access, with over ten thousand respondents from across Wiley’s journal portfolio. The research explored the factors that authors assess when deciding where to publish, and whether to publish open access. Among the top factors considered by authors were the relevance and scope of the journal, the journal’s impact factor and the international reach of the journal.

Over 30% of respondents had published at least one open access paper, and 79% stated that open access was more prevalent in their discipline than three years ago. In the survey, an open access article was defined as “free for all to read, download and share online and the author, their institution or funding body pays a fee to ensure that the article is made open access.”

Among authors yet to publish open access, the list of reasons given included a lack of high profile open access journals (48%), lack of funding (44%) and concerns about quality (34%). Authors said they would publish in an open access journal if it had a high impact factor, if it were well regarded and if it had a rigorous peer review process.

“Our goal was to better understand the opinions and behavior of our authors towards open access publishing. It’s clear from the survey results that authors are increasingly embracing this publishing model, and we have seen evidence of that too in the growth of our Wiley Open Access publishing program,” said Rachel Burley, Vice President and Director, Open Access, Wiley. “The survey results also highlight the need for open access journals to continue to build a strong foundation of rigorous peer review, wide international reach and a sharp focus on quality to respond to the needs that authors expressed in this research.”

The survey, conducted in May 2012, was sent to 104,000 authors who published research in Wiley journals in health, life, physical, and social sciences, and the humanities, during 2011. The total number of authors who participated in the survey was 10,673, representing a 10.3% response rate.

The responding authors represented a range of international opinions on open access. While 30% of authors were located in the United States and 10% were based in the UK, other represented nations included Germany (4%), China (4%), and India (3%).

One in three authors (32%) had already published in an open access journal. The highest proportion of open access authors came from a medical background (28%), closely followed by biological sciences (24%), and 71% were based in an academic setting. In contrast, authors who had not published open access papers predominantly came from social science disciplines.

The survey results are available online via slideshare.

British Ecological Society Partners With Wiley Open Access Journal Ecology and Evolution

Ecology and EvolutionJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc., has announced a new partnership between the British Ecological Society (BES) and the Wiley Open Access journal Ecology and Evolution. This latest partnership brings the number of high profile journals supporting the open access title to 16. Eleven of these partner titles are ranked in the top 20 ecology journals by the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI).

BES journals will join other high impact titles in offering authors a rapid manuscript transferal system which maintains the integrity of peer review and allows authors to meet the requirements of their funders.

Since the inaugural issue of Ecology and Evolution in September 2011, more than 250 papers have been published in the journal. The support of the five BES journal titles, all of which rank in the top 20% of ecology journals (ISI), will ensure Ecology and Evolution continues to attract the latest prestigious research from across the discipline.

Ecology and Evolution publishes papers under the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction, provided the original work is properly cited. An article publication charge (APC) is payable by authors on acceptance of their articles and under this new partnership BES members can take advantage of a 10% discount on this charge.

“Having published ecological journals for 100 years, we are delighted to announce this partnership as we embark on the BES’s centenary year,” said Georgina Mace, President of the BES. “Our established journals receive increasing numbers of high quality submissions each year and this involvement with Ecology and Evolution will enable us to further serve our ecological community by publishing more of this important ecological research.”

Ecology and Evolution is also expanding its editorial expertise with the appointment of new editor Dr Andrew Beckerman, from the University of Sheffield, UK, who joins Allen Moore, from the University of Georgia, USA, in leading the journal.

Dr Beckerman is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Animal and Plant Sciences. His research links genetics, behaviour and life history to the distribution and abundance of organisms and the structure and dynamics of communities. Andrew has previously served as an Associate Editor for the Journal of Animal Ecology and Ecology Letters.

“I am excited to join Allen and the team on this journal with its broad subject coverage cutting across ecology and evolution, and to become part of an interesting venture in open access publishing,” said Dr Beckerman.

“We are thrilled that the BES has chosen to extend our 60-year relationship by collaborating with us on the open access journal, Ecology and Evolution,” said Liz Ferguson, Editorial Director, Life Science, Wiley. “This new partnership is a great fit for the editorial ambitions of Ecology and Evolution and we are also delighted to welcome Andrew at this critical stage of the Journal’s development.”

Please visit the journal’s website www.ecolevol.org  for further information and future updates.

Another Successful Open Access Week in Woods Hole Massachusetts

Today, October 24th, the MBLWHOI Library of the Marine Biological Laboratory and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution held a general Open Access discussion involving divergent points of view…and we all had some cake to celebrate the day as well!

Let them eat cake!

The discussion was let by 2 scientists and one editor of our in house journal…and attended by about 20 members of the Woods Hole scientific community.

What we all agreed is that the world is changing, dramatically, and while open access holds much promise and is a good thing, the practice of and dissemination of science must not be compromised by an unclear open access mission. Scientists need to know their work is not compromised…we handed out copies of Beall’s Predatory List…which everyone found to be a helpful tool, as well as many other open access resources. Librarians may see the benefits of open access clearly, and we must be there for the communities we serve to understand that their needs must be satisfied as well.

We had a positive event!

Open Access Seminar @ Vaal University of Technology, 25/10/12

I have attended today, 25 October 2012 an Open Access Seminar at Vaal University of Technology.

Thanks to the VUT Library for organising the event and especially to Mr. Freeman Zulu, VUT Library Director: Client Services for inviting me to speak.

We had a lovely morning engaging in conversation about OA, the important role of the Institutional Repositories in making available free research content; OA South African & African collections, etc.

The detailed program is available here:http://www.vut.ac.za/new/images/Library/invitation-oa.pdf 

I have uploaded my Open Access presentation on SlideShare:

http://www.slide share.net/pavlinka163/open-access-for-research-the-librarian-overview-of-opportunities-trends 

On the picture, the speakers at the VUT Open Access seminar: 

Mr. Pierre Malan (Director Client Services, SABINET); 

Ms Susan Veldsman (Director: Scholarly Publishing Unit, Academy of Science of South Africa (ASSAF);

Pavlinka Kovatcheva, Faculty Librarian:Sciences; 

Ms Ina Smit (E-Research & Repository Manager, University of Stellenbosch);

Freeman Zulu, VUT HoD: Library Client Services;

Prof Pierre De Villiers (Managing Director, African Online Scientific Information Systems (AOSIS) (Pty) Ltd; 

Ms Hettie Groenewald (Institutional Repository Manager, University of Pretoria)