A draft open-access mandate for Denmark. The Danish Agency for Science,…

The Danish Agency for Science, Technology and Innovation just released a draft open-access mandate for publicly-funded research in Denmark. It’s a green policy (following the EU and US rather than the UK) and make use of rights retention (following the Wellcome Trust, NIH, and Harvard). 

I called it a policy for publicly-funded research, but it aspires to go further: “To create free access for all citizens, researchers and companies to all research articles from Danish research institutions financed by public authorities and/or private foundations.”
It doesn’t yet include details that matter to OA specialists, e.g. timing of deposits, embargoes, open licensing, and application to data. But I imagine that these details will come in due time. Meanwhile the Ministry has signaled its commitment to open access and is open to comments.

Denmark´s National Strategy for Open Access

“The gains for Danish companies, Danish research and Danish society from free access – Open Access – to research findings are numerous. With increased accessibility to scientific articles on the Internet for all, we will achieve much more effective knowledge sharing among researchers, research institutions and companies. Open Access will result in new and improved research opportunities – especially with regard to inter-disciplinary research – and improve access to research-based 

knowledge for companies and others, thereby contributing to ensuring that stateof-the-art research is put to use more swiftly to create innovation and growth in society….

A draft open-access mandate for Denmark.

The Danish Agency for Science, Technology and Innovation just released a draft open-access mandate for publicly-funded research in Denmark. It’s a green policy (following the EU and US rather than the UK) and make use of rights retention (following the Wellcome Trust, NIH, and Harvard). 

I called it a policy for publicly-funded research, but it aspires to go further: “To create free access for all citizens, researchers and companies to all research articles from Danish research institutions financed by public authorities and/or private foundations.”
It doesn’t yet include details that matter to OA specialists, e.g. timing of deposits, embargoes, open licensing, and application to data. But I imagine that these details will come in due time. Meanwhile the Ministry has signaled its commitment to open access and is open to comments.

Apply Now! Generation Open Grants to Support Young Researcher-Led Open Access Week Events

 

Today, the Right to Research Coalition announces the Generation Open Grants, a new initiative to support students and early career researchers in hosting events and raising awareness during the 2014 International Open Access Week, from October 20th through the 26th. The grants build upon this year’s Open Access Week theme of Generation Open, which will highlight the importance of students and early career researchers and explore how the transition toward Open Access affects researchers at different stages of their careers.

 

The Right to Research Coalition will fund a total of $4,000 in Generation Open Grants, ranging in size from $250 up to a maximum of $1,000 per organization. Those applying for a grant will have the ability to choose what level of funding they feel is appropriate for their proposed event. Guidance on expectations for grants of various sizes can be found on the Generation Open Grant homepage.

 

The Generation Open Grants can be put toward a range of events, from watch parties for the SPARC-World Bank Open Access Week Kickoff Event to campus-wide campaigns and mini-conferences. This year’s grant program builds on previous Right to Research Coalition efforts during Open Access Week, most notably a partnership with the Medical Students’ Association of Kenya which educated nearly half of Kenyan medical students about Open Access during the week. The Generation Open Grants will seek to identify and support innovative new ideas for events and awareness raising strategies to engage peers and/or the wider campus community on Open Access. A perfect example of this being OpenUCT’s “Open Access Challenge”.

 

Seven years ago, students partnered with SPARC to organize a day of coordinated on-campus events in support of Open Access that quickly grew into International Open Access Week. The Generation Open Grants will support and advance the involvement of students and early career researchers that lies at the heart of Open Access Week.

 

Applications are now open and will close on August 18th at midnight Pacific Daylight Time (GMT – 7:00). Winning applications will be announced by August 29th. You can find more information on the Generation Open Grants as well as how to apply here

Generation Open Grants

Generation Open Grants for
International Open Access Week 2014

Apply | Event Ideas | Add-ons | Guidelines | Support 

Introducing Generation Open Grants

Generation Open Grants are a new Right to Research Coalition initiative to support students and early career researchers in hosting events and raising awareness during the 2014 International Open Access Week, from October 20th through the 26th. The grant program builds upon this year’s Open Access Week theme of Generation Open, which will highlight the importance of students and early career researchers and explore how the transition toward Open Access affects researchers at different stages of their careers.

The Right to Research Coalition will fund a total of $4,000 in Generation Open Grants, ranging in size from $250 up to a maximum of $1,000 per organization.

Generation Open Grants can be put toward a range of events, from watch parties for the SPARC-World Bank Open Access Week Kickoff Event to campus-wide campaigns and mini-conferences. Generation Open Grants also seek to identify and support innovative new ideas for events and awareness raising strategies to engage peers and/or the wider campus community on Open Access.

Applications are now open and will close on August 19th at midnight Pacific Daylight Time (GMT – 7:00). You can find more information on the Generation Open Grants as well as how to apply on this page

A full announcement can be found here

Event ideas

$250: Local watch party

These would be grants aimed at supporting simple events and to pay for costs such as catering and printing. An example event would be hosting a local watch party for the SPARC-World Bank Open Access Week Kickoff Event with some provided food and drink refreshments. Another example could be using the grant for material to produce Overprice Tag or buy a prize for an Open Access challenge.

$500: Large local events

This size grant could go to support a screening of the SPARC-World Bank Open Access Week Kickoff Event that is supplemented with in-person speakers and includes a plan to attract a significant audience. This level of event should also be tied to action items, such as meeting with university administrators to express support for Open Access or any of the event add-ons listed below. Grant support could be used for merchandise, catering, and handouts.

$1000: National events / week-long campaigns

Grants of this size would support ambitious events, for example conference style events attracting participation from across a region or a series of smaller events facilitated by a larger organisation. A grant at this level could also go to an organization hosting a series of events and/or awareness raising actions throughout the week.

Event Add-ons

The following ideas, strategies, and actions can be incorporated into your main event proposal to strengthen your application and increase your chance of being funded:

  • Get local faculty and/or librarians involved

  • Host an Open Access information booth during the week

  • Create an on-campus Open Access working group after the week

  • Raise awareness of the cost of journals with Overprice tags which show how expensive journal prices are.

  • Live stream and/or record the event

  • Solicit matching funds for the event

  • Develop a social media plan for the event

  • Set up tables for an  “Open Access Challenge” where individuals are asked to answer a research question with and without access to our university’s journal subscriptions

Incorporate the launch of the Open Access Button into our event – What this means.

Application Guidelines

  • Generation Open Grants are for events hosted by student or early career researcher-led organizations. Funds must be receive by an eligible organization, and restrictions prohibit the transfer of funds to individuals.

  • In the case of an organization having local and national groups, we will accept multiple applications from one organization. However, where possible, applications should be grouped.

  • Applications for timeshifted event that occur up to two weeks before or two weeks after Open Access Week (October 20-26) will be accepted.

  • Applications will be assessed on event location, impact, visibility, novelty and achievability.

  • Grantees receiving $500 or less will need to submit a 1 page report. Grants in excess of $500 will require a 2 page report. Reports are due within 30 days of the completion of the sponsored event. For all funded events, we expect supporting materials such as photos and videos to be submitted with a CC-BY licence alongside receipts for purchases. Finally, we request a blog to be written about the event.

We will announce the selected Generation Open Grant recipients by August 29th. Unfortunately, due to time restraints, we will not be able to feedback on unsuccessful applications.

Grant application support

There is support available for developing your application and planning your event. We’ve setup a number of drop-in calls which you can ask questions, get feedback on an idea, or troubleshoot a problem.

5 – 7pm GMT+1 on Thursday 24th of July – Click to join (Google Hangout)Call notes

8 – 10am GMT+1 on Wednesday 29th of July – Click to join (Google Hangout) Call notes

3 – 5am GMT+1 on Tuesday 5th of August – Click to join (Google Hangout)Call notes

5 – 7pm GMT+1 on Thursday 14th of August – Click to join (Google Hangout)Call notes

10 – 12am GMT+1 on Monday the 21th of August – Click to join (Google Hangout)Call notes

[More announced soon]

 

 

If you can’t make those calls though, feel free to contact Joe [AT] righttoresearch [DOT] org and we’ll be in touch.

Apply for a Generation Open Grant

To apply for a Generation Open Grant, please fill in the form below. Applications will remain open from July 22nd until August 18th at midnight Pacific Daylight Time (GMT – 7:00).  Successful applicants will be notified by August 29th.

 

More Information

OpenUCT’s Access Challenge

Participants hard at work

One of the greatest challenges in raising awareness around open access is engaging students in a meaningful and productive way. Last year at the OpenUCT Initiative we were faced with this task. Most students take access for granted until they leave their respective tertiary institutions and are confronted with nasty pay-walls. Panel discussions, information sessions and debates fail to entice students. So how do we expose students to the lack of access, or as I like to call to “lackcess”, they will experience once they are handed their degrees and sent on their way? Our answer was the Access Challenge.

The idea for the Access Challenge stemmed from open and closed medical and scientific studies run concurrently to see which of the two was more successful. Studies that were open to the public domain concluded faster and were more successful, this is because more people were allowed to access the study, to test results and contribute and critique the process. With this in mind, we at the OpenUCT Initiative based the Access Challenge on the open-versus-closed study design.

Four laptops were setup in a highly trafficked campus space– two laptops were linked to the University of Cape Town network, while the other two were not. We purchased internet bundles for the laptops deprived of campus network access. Questions were set whereby students were asked to access certain papers, or answer questions trapped behind pay-walls. Those without UCT network access struggled to answer many questions and access certain journals, while those with campus access breezed through the challenge without any fuss.

The challenge attracts a crowd

Once the challenge was complete we asked students what they thought of the exercise. These were some of the responses:

“Access outside the confines and privileges of UCT can be challenging.”

“Academic institutions access to journals is very helpful. Personally, I cannot afford to pay.”

“Individual articles are expensive and sometimes reading the preview…gives you the wrong idea.”

Instead of preaching to students about Open Access, we got students to think about it for themselves. This exercise raised the awareness we struggled to achieve in other forums with students.

Please feel free to appropriate a similar strategy during your OA Week activities and let us know how it goes. If you would like to see what else we got up to during OA Week 2013, visit http://openuct.uct.ac.za/blog/wrap-open-access-week-2013.

If you have any questions or concerns please contact me at: Uvania.n@gmail.com

Posted on behalf of the Author: Uvania Naidoo

Kerala kids rock digitization of heritage materials

Schoolkids and the public in Kerala, India, digitized, proof-read and uploaded 150 rare and out-of-print books for the Malayam Wiki Library. What a great idea! The students and members of the public get to contribute to something that is real and of lasting value, not just some classroom exercise to mark and throw away, and the important work of digitization gets done.

There are a number of similar initiatives in India. Apparently the Digital Library of India “states that they are trying to digitize all the significant works of mankind”!

Good luck to them! What are your kids doing in their school?

OpenCon 2014 Travel Scholarship Logistics & FAQ

1. How do we sign up to fund a travel scholarship for OpenCon 2014?

Please visit www.righttoresearch.org/act/opencon/sponsor and fill out the form with your information. The organizers will then contact you with a copy of the OpenCon sponsorship agreement for you to sign and instructions for submitting payment. 

Checks should be made payable to our fiscal sponsor, the Association of Research Libraries, and mailed to: ?

Right to Research Coalition?
c/o Shawn Daugherty?
21 Dupont Circle NW, Suite 800 
Washington, DC 20036, United States 
 

2. Can we select the recipient of the travel scholarship? How do we go about doing that?

Yes!  Sponsoring a travel scholarship comes with the option to select the recipient.  There are two ways you can go about this.

First, you are welcome to select the recipient by setting up your own application process or by simply choosing the recipient you have in mind. We only ask that you let us know who the recipient is by October 3rd for U.S. residents and passport holders, and September 19th for recipients who will require a visa to enter the U.S

The other option is to have candidates apply for your scholarship through the OpenCon application system. We can provide a custom URL unique to your travel scholarship, and we will collect the applications on your behalf. We will then provide the information to you to select the winning candidate. If you run your application period in tandem with the general application period for OpenCon (August 4 – August 25), the remaining applications that you do not select will be returned to the general applicant pool and will be eligible for selection for a travel scholarship from the OpenCon general fund. 

While we leave the selection of your recipient entirely to you, we strongly encourage you to make the most of your sponsorship by selecting a qualified student or early career researcher who is passionate about Open Access, Open Education, and/or Open Data
 

3. What if we don’t want to select a specific recipient for our scholarship?

That’s great too! If you would simply like to support the meeting with a travel scholarship and don’t wish to select the recipient, we will add the sponsorship amount to the general travel scholarship fund to be given to the most qualified candidates as determined by the OpenCon Organizing Committee. You can also specify that your scholarship be used for a student in a particular discipline or from a particular region.
 

4. What is the deadline to sponsor a travel scholarship?

While there isn’t a hard cutoff date for sponsoring new travel scholarships, finalizing the sponsorship sooner (by August, or September at the latest) will help ensure a smoother process.
 

5. What is the deadline for selecting the recipient of a sponsored travel scholarship?

We ask that sponsors inform us of selection decisions at the latest by October 3rd for U.S. residents and passport holders, and by September 19th for recipients who will require a visa to enter the U.S., in order to allow ample time for travel arrangements to be made. Earlier selection decisions are encouraged and both reduce the potential for complications booking travel and ensure the maximum impact of your scholarship.

Please note that if you plan to run your application process through the OpenCon system and would like the applicants you do not select to be considered for a scholarship from the OpenCon general fund, you will need to run your application period between August 4th and 25th and notify us of the winner by September 1st. 

If you are unable to meet the October 3rd deadline (or September 19th for recipients requiring visas), please let us know and we can plan ahead.
  

6. What if we don’t end up finding a recipient for our scholarship?

If you don’t identify a recipient of your travel scholarship, we will add the sponsorship amount to the general travel scholarship fund to be given to the most qualified candidates as determined by the OpenCon Organizing Committee.
 

7. Will you provide any resources to help promote applications?

Yes! In addition to the custom URL for individuals to apply for your travel scholarship specifically, we will provide a one-page flyer for you to use to encourage individuals from your campus or organization to apply. We anticipate these resources will be available by the end of July.

We will also have an orientation call for travel scholarship sponsors on July 28th at 2:00pm EDT to go over details for how the travel scholarships will function and to address any questions sponsoring organizations may have.  You can register for the orientation call by clicking here, which will take you to the registration form at the bottom of this page. If you cannot attend this session, we’re happy to schedule individual calls with sponsors or potential sponsors to discuss the process and confirm details.
 

8. Does the travel scholarship cover all the cost of attendance?

The travel scholarship secures your recipient a spot at the conference and covers the cost of attendance up to the scholarship amount of $1,500—including travel, accommodations, and meals that are provided at the conference.  Any additional cost would need to be paid by the sponsoring organization.  After accommodation, food, and other costs are taken into account, the remaining scholarship will cover roughly up to $1,000 worth of travel expenses.
 

9. Can we send more than one participant by sponsoring multiple travel scholarships?

Yes, at this time there is not a limit on the number of sponsorships from a single institution or organization, and some sponsors have already committed to multiple scholarships.  However, the organizers reserve the right to limit the number of scholarships from a single institution in order to ensure a diverse pool of participants if necessary.
 

10. How do we handle arranging travel for the selected participant?

The conference organizers will book travel and accommodations for all travel scholarship recipients, so you do not have to handle any of it.  Any funds remaining from the $1,500 scholarship after your selected participant is booked will go toward providing assistance to other qualified students and young researchers.  

Please do note that funded participants will share a hotel room with a fellow attendee at the event. If you wish to provide additional funding to secure a single room for your recipient, please let us know at the time you establish your sponsorship.
 

11. Why does OpenCon have an application process instead of open registration?

OpenCon is a little different than other conferences.  Because students and early career researchers often have limited access to travel funding, the cost of attendance for a large portion of the attendees must be covered in order to allow them to attend regardless of their financial circumstances.  There is also far more interest in attendance than we can accommodate.  Last year, the Berlin 11 Satellite Conference for Students and Early Career Researchers that provides the foundation for OpenCon received more than 5 applications for every available place at the meeting.  Because of these factors, we feel that the only equitable way to determine who attends is through an application process that is judged by our Organizing Committee of students and early career researchers.
 

12. Are there discounts for sponsoring multiple travel scholarships?

No, each travel scholarship is $1,500 regardless of the number sponsored.
 

Register for the travel scholarship orientation call at 2pm EDT on Monday, July 28th, by filling in the form below.

“Library-led Publishing with bepress Digital Commons: Data and Benchm” by Casey Busher, Irene Kamotsky et al.

Use the link to access the full text report.  The abstract reads as follows: “The Digital Commons community launched 156 journals in 2013, putting the total number of journals published across all Digital Commons repositories at almost 700, including law reviews. These numbers speak to the success of library-led publishing efforts, and there is much more to discover by exploring the journals’ publishing history and performance data in more detail.

This report presents detailed data from across all journals hosted on Digital Commons. We show how publishing rates and readership vary within the community and how these trends can be used to derive target activity levels for new journals. We also look at publishing across various disciplines to see which of those disciplines are well represented and which may be underrepresented. Measuring the success of publishing efforts can be key in proving viability to stakeholders. Using data that reflects the publishing experiences of over 180 institutions, we’re able to suggest benchmarks of publishing activity and readership that will help publishers set goals and prove effectiveness.”

Companies House is to make all of its digital data available free of charge.

“Companies House is to make all of its digital data available free of charge. This will make the UK the first country to establish a truly open register of business information.

As a result, it will be easier for businesses and members of the public to research and scrutinise the activities and ownership of companies and connected individuals. Last year (2013/14), customers searching the Companies House website spent £8.7 million accessing company information on the register.
This is a considerable step forward in improving corporate transparency; a key strand of the G8 declaration at the Lough Erne summit in 2013.

It will also open up opportunities for entrepreneurs to come up with innovative ways of using the information….”