Satellite Event Logistics

 

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Any and all information on the logistics for running a satellite event in conduction with the main OpenCon 2014 meeting will be provided below.
 

Schedule and Agenda – [More coming soon]

The webcast part of the conference will run from approximately 9:00AM EST till around 6:00PM EST on November 15th and 16th. We will continue to update this section with the agenda as it’s confirmed.
 

Details on the webcast – [More coming soon]

The keynotes, panels, and some workshops will be webcast live. We’ll include more details on this as they become available. We are currently aiming to have downloadable versions of the sessions made available within 12 hours of the event.
 

Webcast back-up plans – [More coming soon]

We know webcasts can sometimes go wrong. We’re putting several back-up mechanisms into place in case the feed is interrupted so you won’t be left without something to watch. This will include call in lines, so at least audio could be heard, back-up video streams and finally a list of compelling videos to screen as a final option. Let us know if you have other ideas to add to this list by emailing joe [at] righttoresearch [dot] org.

Keep you in the loop during the conference

On November 15th and 16th, organisers will be available to field any questions and keep satellite events in the loop on everything happening at the conference. If a session is running late, you’ll know. If a speaker cancels at the last moment, you’ll know. If we’re having technical difficulties, we’ll get you a work around as soon as possible.

Conference hashtag will be #opencon14

Reporting back

We’re very interested to hear what happened at any and all satellite events and to see any pictures or video that is taken. We’ll follow up with you after the event to debrief and get suggestions for the next OpenCon.

Call for OpenCon 2014 Satellite Event Partners

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Since announcing OpenCon 2014: the Student and Early Career Researcher Conference on Open Access, Open Education and Open Data 6 weeks ago, we’ve received an overwhelming amount of interest and support from the community. More than 500 people from well over 75 countries have signed up for updates, many of whom have volunteered to help make the meeting a success. Organisations from across the Open communities have also stepped up to support the meeting with sponsorship, including the Max Planck Society, eLife, Overleaf by WriteLaTeX and a growing number of university libraries. Today, we’re announcing a call for partners in organizing OpenCon 2014 satellites events around the world to bring the energy of the in-person event to those unable to attend the conference in Washington, DC.

The predecessor to OpenCon 2014 saw five applications for every available space at the meeting, and OpenCon is on course to exceed this. For those who can’t attend the main meeting, satellite events will provide a way to participate in the conference, join the growing OpenCon community, and become Open advocates by attending an event closer to home. As with the main conference, satellite events will provide a place to conceptualize, catalyze, and launch initiatives advancing Open Access, Open Data and Open Education. Satellite events will also serve as an excellent opportunity to capitalise on excitement generated from International Open Access Week and can reflect the fact that conversations surrounding Open Access, Open Education and Open Data are not homogeneous and vary country by country and institution.

Satellite event partners will have the latitude to design an event which suits their needs, while being supported and guided from peers, OpenCon 2014 organisers, and the Right to Research Coalition. Satellite events can be held concurrently, time shifted, or on different days. They can rely exclusively on OpenCon 2014 keynotes and panels for programming, or they can be a mix of content from the main OpenCon meeting and locally organized presentations. Satellite events are expected to range in size from small viewing parties to more expansive events that include many local advocates and experts to provide their perspective. We’re committed to supporting local partners. We’ve developed a support pack which provides ideas on running impactful events, guidance on doing a professional meeting, access to support, resources and more. Support materials for satellite events will also be available in Spanish, and potentially other languages, to reach potential partners in various countries and increase the diversity of events.

Many organizations have already expressed interest in hosting satellite events. John Hammersley, co-founder of WriteLaTeX, is one such organizing partner: “We’re delighted to further support OpenCon 2014 and make it even more international by holding a satellite event in London. OpenCon is all about getting students and early career researchers involved in these key topics and by holding a satellite event we can help the event reach and include as many people as possible. ”

Individuals or organisations interested in planning an event can learn more, find support and download resources here: http://www.righttoresearch.org/act/opencon/satellite. Hosting a satellite event can be a great way to continue the conversation around International Open Access Week and to build contacts and momentum in your area. The first of a series of drop-in calls for those interested in running events will be later this week from 9-10am GMT on Friday the 17th of July. Details on joining can be found here: http://www.righttoresearch.org/act/opencon/satellite/support.

Getting Support for your Satellite Event

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Event Support

We want to do everything we can to help you to pull off events. The first thing to do is get connected, follow us on twitter (here and here) and facebook where we’ll post updates. Once you’ve registered as a host we’ll add you to a group with all the other hosts to share ideas and keep you in the loop on the conference.
 

We can also provide you mentors from our organising committee, who will help support you further if you need it. Of course, you can always contact us directly with questions by emailing joe [at] righttoresearch.org. On the day of OpenCon 2014, you’ll have a direct line to someone at the conference who’ll be able to ensure you’re not in the dark at any point.

We will also be hosting drop-in calls where you can ask questions about becoming a host or get support for hosting a satellite event you’re already planning.  The times for our scheduled drop-in calls are listed below along with links to join each.
 

9 -10am GMT+1 on Friday the 18th of July – Click to join (Google Hangout)Call notes

5 – 7pm GMT+1 on Thursday 24th of July – Click to join (Google Hangout)Call notes

8 – 10am GMT+1 on Wednesday 29th of July – Click to join (Google Hangout) Call notes

3 – 5am GMT+1 on Tuesday 5th of August – Click to join (Google Hangout)Call notes

5 – 7pm GMT+1 on Thursday 14th of August – Click to join (Google Hangout)Call notes

10 – 12am GMT+1 on Monday the 21th of August – Click to join (Google Hangout)Call notes

Publicity Support

A key worry about hosting events is always “will anyone turn up?”. It’s good to think very early about how you will advertise the event, both online and in the real world. We won’t leave you unsupported here though! Below is a selection of resources that we will provide in the coming weeks:

      

  • A web page for your event where you can sign people up, describe the event and provide key details. These will be included in the main OpenCon site. To request one of these head here.

  • Publicity through our social media accounts.

  • Professional, customisable posters which you can use on-campus.

  • Photos and graphics you can use on social media to advertise the event.

  • Any applicants from your area who cannot attend the main event in Washington DC will receive an email advertising the opportunity to attend your satellite event.

If you would like to request support from the OpenCon 2014 organizers, please fill in the form below and a representative will follow up with you shortly.

If there are other ways we can help, please let us know.

Satellite Event Ideas

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Satellite events are partnered with the main OpenCon meeting in Washington DC, but can be customized significantly. For example:

  • You can time shift the event to suit local times, or hold it on a different weekend.

  • You could invite local speakers, have local workshops and panels as you please in addition to showing selected sessions from the main event.

  • You could hold a shorter meeting, including only the sessions that are most relevant to your institution.

 

Here are some suggestions of the types of event we’ve imagined:

 

Small satellite event

  • Book a small room

  • Put on the live stream

  • During workshops host informal discussions on the topics raised,

  • Try to attract 15+ participants

  • Plan a social event for informal discussions after

Large satellite event

  • Book a lecture room

  • Put on the live stream

  • Provide some food

  • Have a structured workshop or local speaker

  • Try to attract 50 participants

  • Organise a simple evening activity

Mini-conference

  • Book a lecture room and breakout rooms

  • Put on the live stream

  • Have a few local elements including workshops and talks

  • Try to attract 100+ participants

  • Include some event swag, either sponsored or that you create

  • Include food and drinks after the event

Extras to improve your event

  • Coordinate with your local librarians—very important!

  • Invite local policy makers

  • Put on your own workshops

  • Try and set up a local working group to help organize the meeting

  • Write a blog post

  • Take some pictures and send them in!

Workshop ideas: In the coming weeks, we’ll provide ideas for workshops to consider including as part of your OpenCon 2014 satellite event.

OpenCon Satellite Events

 

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What are OpenCon 2014 satellite events?

OpenCon 2014 Satellite events are events of any size, in any place held in partnership with the main conference (more on OpenCon 2014 here). Last year the conference that OpenCon builds upon—the Berlin 11 Satellite Conference for Students and Early Stage Researchers— had five applicants for every person accepted, so this year we felt it was important to allow more of those interested to participate. That’s what this is all about. We are also interested in using locally organized events to reflect the fact that the conversation around these issues can be very different depending on where they’re had.

Why should you consider hosting an OpenCon 2014 satellite event?

In these pages, you’ll find help every step of the way in planning an event. Here are a few reasons why you might consider organizing an OpenCon satellite event:

  • It’s a great way to kick start or continue to build the momentum for Open Access, Open Education, and/or Open Data in your area and in tandem with others across the world;

  • By providing part or all of the content, it decreases the amount of effort involved in planning a meeting on these issues;

  • You can host the event in a way which suits you—on your own timeline and with your own speakers, policy makers and more;

  • Satellite events are a great way to continue the Open Access Week conversation; and,

  • It’s great experience that allows you to join in a conversation with peers around the world.

Steps for getting started

1. Get in contact and get connected! We can’t support you if you don’t tell us you’re doing an event! If you’re interested in hosting an event head here and get linked up to make sure you get all the info, help and support you need.

2. Have a look around the satellite event pack. You’ll find resources for publicising your event, obtaining sign-ups, information for streaming on the day and more. We’ll keep updating this kit as resources become available so keep checking back.

3. Brainstorm for your event. This is the fun bit! Start to think about what you’d like your event to look like. We’re happy to chat through ideas with you – but remember this is your event. We’ve given you a headstart here though!

4. Get planning! Once you’ve got your ideas together, it’s time to get planning—the sooner the better for a great event. If you need help getting started or hit a hurdle, join one of our drop in calls, or use the support kit provided and request and event mentor.

5. Get the word out and get sign ups. Once you’ve confirmed the day and the necessary details about the event, it’s time to get the word out! We’ll support you with managing signups, providing poster templates, creating an event website, sending publicity emails, and more.  Details can be found here.

Register to Host an OpenCon Satellite Event

Fill in the form below to express your interest in hosting an OpenCon satellite event. Once submitted, an organizer from OpenCon 2014 will follow up with you directly.

“On the Mark? Responses to a Sting” by Amy Buckland, Martin Paul Eve et al.

“As a contribution to these discussions, JLSC invited several researchers to 

briefly comment on the Science [John Bohannon sting] article. Eve describes 
how publishing has become more about measuring 
and ranking academics than about communicating 
research findings. Steel calls for a re-evaluation of the 
publishing system in general and affirms the need for 
greater transparency. Gardy addresses the flaws and 
inconsistencies of peer review. And, finally, Salo tackles 
the “sting”—and the need for even more of them….”

Inconsistent XML as a Barrier to Reuse of Open Access Content – Journal Article Tag Suite Conference (JATS-Con) Proceedings 2013 – NCBI Bookshelf

Abstract:  In this paper, we will describe the current state of some of the tagging of articles within the PMC Open Access subset. As a case study, we will use our experiences developing the Open Access Media Importer, a tool to harvest content from the OA subset for automated upload to Wikimedia Commons.

Tagging inconsistencies stretch across several aspects of the articles, ranging from licensing to keywords to the media types of supplementary materials. While all of these complicate large-scale reuse, the unclear licensing statements had the greatest impact, requiring us to implement text mining-like algorithms in order to accurately determine whether or not specific content was compatible with reuse on Wikimedia Commons.
Besides presenting examples of incorrectly tagged XML from a range of publishers, we will also explore past and current efforts towards standardization of license tagging, and we will describe a set of recommendations related to tagging practices of certain data, to ensure that it is both compatible with existing standards, and consistent and machine-readable.

JATS4R – JATS for Reuse

“JATS4R aims to help standardisation of xml used in scientific publishing workflows. We take specific areas of interest (such as licenses or author contributions) and work to define best practice tagging guidelines, along with tools that can help publishers identify whether their content is compliant with those best practices.

By doing this, we hope to make the research literature more accessible for data miners, and to lower costs when content needs to be exchanged or moved at scale, by bringing more consistency to the way the literature is tagged….”

Inconsistent XML as a Barrier to Reuse of Open Access Content

Abstract:  In our paper, we described the current state of some of the tagging of articles within the PMC Open Access subset. As a case study, we used our experiences developing the Open Access Media Importer, a tool to harvest content from the OA subset and automatically upload it to Wikimedia Commons.

Tagging inconsistencies stretch across several aspects of the articles, ranging from licensing to keywords to the media types of supplementary materials. While all of these complicate large-scale reuse, the unclear licensing statements required us to implement text mining-like algorithms in order to accurately determine whether or not specific content was compatible with reuse on Wikimedia Commons.
Besides presenting examples of incorrectly tagged XML from a range of publishers, we will also explore past and current efforts towards standardization of license tagging, and we will describe a set of recommendations for generators of content on how best to tag certain data so that it is both compatible with existing standards, and consistent and machine-readable.

Jean-Claude Bradley Memorial Symposium ; Updates, including live streaming

Tomorrow we have the Memorial Symposium for Jean-Clause Bradley in Cambridge:

http://inmemoriamjcb.wikispaces.com/Jean-Claude+Bradley+Memorial+Symposium

We have 13 speakers and other items related to JCB. The lecture theatre is nearly full (ca 48 people)

** We have arranged live streaming and recording so those who cannot attend in person can follow and we will also have a recording (don’t know how long that will take to edit) **

Here are the notes – please try them out:

===========================
Meeting Name: Unilever Centre Lecture Theatre

Invited By: IT Support Chemistry

To join the meeting:
https://collab8.adobeconnect.com/chem-conference/

—————-

If you have never attended an Adobe Connect meeting before:

Test your connection: https://collab8.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm

Get a quick overview: http://www.adobe.com/go/connectpro_overview

============================

I  suggest a hashtag of #jcbmemorial

We meet tonight in the Anchor pub in Cambridge – I and TonyW will be there at 1800 – I will have to leave ca 1830.

 

 

“An Investigation of ETDs as Prior Publications: Findings from the 2011” by Gail McMillan, Marisa L. Ramirez et al.

Abstract:  Do publishers and editors of scholarly journals view theses and dissertations that are readily available on the Internet and through convenient Web browsers as prior publications? This has been a topic of discussion for well over a decade in the ETD community, not only of concern to graduate schools and libraries but also among research faculty and their graduate students. At the same time that a growing number of universities worldwide are requiring ETDs and making the research and scholarship of their graduate students publicly available, many faculty advise their students to restrict online access to their theses and dissertations due to concerns about future publication options. This paper reports on the 2011 survey results of journal editors’ and university press directors’ attitudes toward online theses and dissertations. This data and the open-ended comments from the survey respondents indicate support for open access to ETDs.

Open Science Codefest

Open Science CodefestThe National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) at UCSB is co-sponsoring the Open Science Codefest 2014, which aims to bring together researchers from ecology, biodiversity science, and other earth and environmental sciences with computer scientists, software engineers, and developers to collaborate on coding projects of mutual interest.

Do you have a coding project that could benefit from collaboration, or software skills you’d like to share? The codefest will be held from September 2-4 in Santa Barbara, CA.

Inspired by hack-a-thons and organized in the participant-driven, unconference style, the Open Science Codefest is for anyone with an interesting problem, solution, or idea that intersects environmental science and computer programming. This is the conference where you will actually get stuff done – whether that’s coding up a new R module, developing an ontology, working on a data repository, creating data visualizations, dreaming up an interactive eco-game, discussing an idea, or any other concrete collaborative goal that interests a group of people.

Looks like a great program!

Scholarly Communication Assistant, Dimond Library, University of New Hampshire

“The UNH Library seeks a conscientious and dependable individual to maintain the UNH Scholars’ Repository (SR), a content management system that houses faculty, student, and institutional research and publications. This position helps researchers deposit materials (research publications, reports, data, and other scholarship) into the IR, creates metadata for IR materials, participates in Open Access education initiatives, researches open access status of published articles and provides backup support for the Digital Collections Initiative….”

OpenCon 2014 Announces the Max Planck Society, eLife, and Overleaf as Sponsors

The organizers of OpenCon 2014 are pleased to announce three new sponsors for the meeting that have made a significant commitment to support student and early career researcher involvement in Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data.  The sponsors are: 

  Presenting Sponsor:                                Webcast Sponsor:                  Supporting Sponsor:
      The Max Planck Society                                        eLife                                        Overleaf               

                     

The Max Planck Gesellschaft is committed to support Open Access on all levels,” said Dr. Georg Botz, Coordinator of Open Access Policy for the Max Planck Society. “It is crucial to foster the engagement of students and early career researchers and to set free the power of the next generation of scholars to create change in order to overcome the inertia of the current scholarly publishing system. Therefore the Max Planck Gesellschaft is proud to support OpenCon 2014 as a valuable complement to the Berlin Open Access conference series.”

The generous contributions from each of these organizations will enable the participation of dozens of students and early career researchers from around the world, regardless of their financial circumstances.  We’re proud to work with such strong partners in making OpenCon 2014 a reality and putting the next generation at the heart of efforts to open up research outputs of all kinds.

“Early-career researchers — PhD students, post-docs, and new group leaders — represent the future of science” said Dr. Mark Patterson, executive director of eLife. “We are delighted to support OpenCon and early-career researchers in general, to ensure that these voices are at the heart of advocacy and policy changes aimed at transforming research communication and accelerating discovery.” 

These sponsoring organizations are already actively working with early career researchers, and one, Overleaf, is actually itself led by young scientists.

“As a team of young scientists ourselves, we’re delighted to be supporting OpenCon 2014 to help develop tools, materials and a community for early stage researchers to learn, collaborate and gain experience in scientific research,” said Dr. John Hammersley, Co-founder and CEO, WriteLaTeX and Overleaf. “With a large student userbase already, we’re planning to create a dedicated section on Overleaf to help collate and disseminate resources, templates and examples from OpenCon 2014 for early stage researchers to get started on their first scientific writing projects.”

We appreciate the commitment of these three leading organizations, and if your organization or institution is interested in joining our growing list of partners by sponsoring OpenCon 2014, please be in touch by emailing nick [at] arl [dot] org.