The SASSCAL contribution to climate observation, climate data management and data rescue in Southern Africa

Abstract. A major task of the newly established “Southern African Science Service Centre for Climate Change and Adaptive Land Management” (SASSCAL; www.sasscal.org) and its partners is to provide science-based environmental information and knowledge which includes the provision of consistent and reliable climate data for Southern Africa. Hence, SASSCAL, in close cooperation with the national weather authorities of Angola, Botswana, Germany and Zambia as well as partner institutions in Namibia and South Africa, supports the extension of the regional meteorological observation network and the improvement of the climate archives at national level. With the ongoing rehabilitation of existing weather stations and the new installation of fully automated weather stations (AWS), altogether 105 AWS currently provide a set of climate variables at 15, 30 and 60 min intervals respectively. These records are made available through the SASSCAL WeatherNet, an online platform providing near-real time data as well as various statistics and graphics, all in open access. This effort is complemented by the harmonization and improvement of climate data management concepts at the national weather authorities, capacity building activities and an extension of the data bases with historical climate data which are still available from different sources. These activities are performed through cooperation between regional and German institutions and will provide important information for climate service related activities.

Open Access Coming to IOVS [Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science]

“Ever since the internet became widely accessible in the 1990s, there has been increasing interest in making the world’s scholarly journals available to all without subscriptions. While publishers initially opposed this, it became clear that the concept of unrestricted access to journals was gaining momentum. Many new journals were started under the open access model, and this has put pressure on traditional publications to do the same. IOVS [Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science] was already participating in free access by providing a 6-month embargo date, and the other ARVO [Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology] journals, Journal of Vision and Translational Vision Science & Technology, were always free access with copyright held by ARVO. Now, it is with great pleasure that I announce that IOVS will go open access starting January 1, 2016….”

Image Resources | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

“The Metropolitan Museum of Art is committed to making a broad range of digital images of artworks in the public domain widely and freely available for scholarly and academic publication. To assist in navigating the vast image content on this website, the Museum has implemented Open Access for Scholarly Content (OASC). Through OASC, artworks in the Collection section of the website which the Museum believes to be in the public domain and free of other known restrictions have been identified by an icon, Open Access for Scholarly Content (OASC) Icon; images associated with these artworks can be downloaded for license- and cost-free scholarly and academic publication, according to the Terms and Conditions. To learn more about how to identify, access, and use the Museum’s Open Access for Scholarly Content (OASC), seeFrequently Asked Questions: Open Access for Scholarly Content (OASC). …”

Introducing the New PLOS Video Shorts

In 2011, PLOS ONE launched a series of short instructional videos to help our authors, reviewers, and Academic Editors navigate Editorial Manager, our online submission system. We recently updated and expanded these video shorts to provide a resource for PLOS authors, … Continue reading »

The post Introducing the New PLOS Video Shorts appeared first on EveryONE.

Nasze publikacje – Platforma Otwartej Nauki [Open Science in Poland 2014. A Diagnosis]

“The aim of the raport “Open Science in Poland 2014. A Diagnosis” is to present a comprehensive overview of the current state of openness in Polish science. In chapter 1, the authors present the institutional context of Open Science in Poland. In chapter 2, they analyse its selected legal aspects. In chapter 3, the current e-infrastructure of Open Access is described. Chapter 4 summarizes the results of desk research and a survey of Polish scientific journals conducted for the purpose of the report, while chapter 5 is devoted to the survey involving Polish scientists. Chapter 6 is concerned with forms of Open Science other than Open Access and open data. The report, edited by Jakub Szprot, was prepared as part of the Open Science Platform activities. It’s available under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 PL licence….”

Open Science in Poland 2014. A Diagnosis

“The aim of the raport “Open Science in Poland 2014. A Diagnosis” is to present a comprehensive overview of the current state of openness in Polish science. In chapter 1, the authors present the institutional context of Open Science in Poland. In chapter 2, they analyse its selected legal aspects. In chapter 3, the current e-infrastructure of Open Access is described. Chapter 4 summarizes the results of desk research and a survey of Polish scientific journals conducted for the purpose of the report, while chapter 5 is devoted to the survey involving Polish scientists. Chapter 6 is concerned with forms of Open Science other than Open Access and open data. The report, edited by Jakub Szprot, was prepared as part of the Open Science Platform activities. It’s available under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 PL licence….”

Openaccess | OpenSky – Providing free and open access to the scholarship of UCAR, NCAR, and the UCP

“In support of its broad mission to foster science, support its community, and facilitate the transfer of knowledge, UCAR endorses a policy of providing open access to its scholarship [in effect since September 10, 2009]. Open Access means that information is freely accessible online to extend the reach and use of UCAR authors’ scholarly works….”

_Open Access_ in Spanish

I’m very happy to report that my book on Open Access (MIT Press, 2012) has been translated into Spanish <ri.uaemex.mx/handle/123456789/21710> and just released by the Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México. 

Many thanks to Remedios Melero for the translation, and to Indrajit Banerjee,Dominique Babini, and Eduardo Aguado for their substantial new introduction on OA in Latin America….”

Horizon Report > 2015 Library Edition

“The experts agreed on two long-term trends: increasing the accessibility of research content, as well as rethinking library spaces to foster more hands-on activities and training opportunities. The former has been gradually growing, largely due to the open content movement as more libraries facilitate open access models for research outputs; the latter is the result of the ways in which the move away from print materials are freeing up physical areas of libraries that can be dedicated to facilitating workshops, media production, and training….”

The university press is back in vogue | The Bookseller

“Not so long ago the advent of digital printing and true print on demand saw flurries of university press start-ups. Now, and above all, it is Open Access (OA) that is acting as the driver. With government and funding organisations concerned that readership for the fruits of research should not be limited by the high price tags of a niche market (although unsure of a viable long-term model for OA books), and with universities obliged to maximise the “impact” of research, OA is seen by some as an inevitable future.

 

Logically, however, OA is additive not substitutive; for some authors in some circumstances it will be appropriate but for others it will not. OA should be a fundamental publishing option offered by academic publishers just like hardback, paperback or the assorted e-book types. There is no one future for the university press. In any case, campus-based OA advocates focusing on research have, by and large, overlooked an area of enormous potential: in an age when the “student experience” is king, with an increasingly diverse and international student body, and with teaching income by far the largest source of revenue for most institutions, the opportunity to develop bespoke OA e-textbooks, as is happening at Liverpool University Press—in a partnership between press and library— is a no-brainer. If that sounds parochial, consider that our first project will replace a textbook from a commercial publisher that costs £56 and has been a compulsory purchase for 900 students on campus each year….”

Concerns dwindle over quality of open access journals | Times Higher Education

“A dwindling number of researchers have concerns about the quality of open access journals, according to a major survey of scholars. Yet journal reputation remains far more important than whether or not it is open access when academics are deciding where to submit, according to the annual study by Nature Publishing Group and Palgrave Macmillan. Last year, four in 10 scientists who had not published in open access journals said that they were ‘concerned about perceptions of the quality’, but this year only 27 per cent said that they had these worries. Humanities, business and social science academics are more concerned – with 41 per cent still having concerns – but this is still substantially fewer than last year …”

Plan for Increased Public Access to Results of Federally Funded Research, August 18, 2015

“This document outlines the Smithsonian Institution’s plan to provide increased public access to certain peer-reviewed scholarly publications and supporting digital research data1 that arise from research funded, in whole or in part, by a federal funding source (hereinafter “Federally Funded Research Materials” or “FFRM”), consistent with the principles of access under the Office of Science and Technology Policy Memorandum dated February 22, 2013.2 This plan is effective as of October 1, 2015; only FFRM submitted for publication on or after the effective date shall be covered….”

Smithsonian Launches Public Access Plan for Research

“The Smithsonian has released its Plan for Increased Public Access to Results of Federally Funded Research, based on the principles outlined by the Office of Science and Technology Policy. Through the new plan, all applicable publications and supporting data resulting from federally funded research will be available through the Smithsonian Research Online (SRO) website or CHORUS, a nonprofit membership organization that helps federal entities increase public access to research. The plan will take effect Oct. 1 and apply to articles submitted to publishers on or after that date….”