NATIONAL ARCHIVES OF JAPAN Digital Archive

“The National Archives of Japan preserves government documents and records of importance as historical materials received by the Prime Minister from various government ministries and agencies, and makes them available to the public with the aim of achieving appropriate preservation and use of such government documents and records that are in the custody of the National Archives or government organs….”

The Cell Image Library

“The Cell Image Library™ is a freely accessible, easy-to-search, public repository of reviewed and annotated images, videos, and animations of cells from a variety of organisms, showcasing cell architecture, intracellular functionalities, and both normal and abnormal processes. The purpose of this database is to advance research, education, and training, with the ultimate goal of improving human health….”

March-in Rights: A Lost Opportunity To Lower US Drug Prices – Intellectual Property Watch

“It appears not just unfair, but absurdly so. The US government paid for research that produced a patented drug, the patents were licensed exclusively to a Japanese firm, and that firm is now committing price discrimination against the US. Astellas Pharma is selling its anti-prostate cancer drug, Xtandi, for over $129,000 per year per patient in the United States – triple the price of the drug in Japan. Alas, this situation is not unusual. Many drugs that were financed by US taxpayers are sold in the US at exorbitant prices, but are much cheaper in other high-income industrialized nations. This differential price problem could be solved easily. However, the US government has consistently refused to exercise its march-in rights in order to lower drug prices….”

March-in Rights: A Lost Opportunity To Lower US Drug Prices – Intellectual Property Watch

“It appears not just unfair, but absurdly so. The US government paid for research that produced a patented drug, the patents were licensed exclusively to a Japanese firm, and that firm is now committing price discrimination against the US. Astellas Pharma is selling its anti-prostate cancer drug, Xtandi, for over $129,000 per year per patient in the United States – triple the price of the drug in Japan. Alas, this situation is not unusual. Many drugs that were financed by US taxpayers are sold in the US at exorbitant prices, but are much cheaper in other high-income industrialized nations. This differential price problem could be solved easily. However, the US government has consistently refused to exercise its march-in rights in order to lower drug prices….”

From Muriqui to Malagasy Rosewood: Endangered Species Research Around the World

Scientific research and communication through publication can be an incredibly powerful tool in the fight against the extinction of threatened species. In honor of Endangered Species Day, this collection of articles recently published in PLOS

WHO | Major research funders and international NGOs to implement WHO standards on reporting clinical trial results

“Some of the world’s largest funders of medical research and international non-governmental organizations today agreed on new standards that will require all clinical trials they fund or support to be registered and the results disclosed publicly.”

Restriction in the use of the RCUK Open Access Block Grant. | Library News

“Due to increased demand for ‘gold’ open access and a significant reduction in the University’s RCUK open access block grant allocation, the Open Access Team has introduced a restriction on the use of the fund for the payment of Article Processing Charges (APCs).

The Open Access Team has ring-fenced the remaining allocation for the following types of costs:

  • APCs for fully Open Access journals (i.e., journals which do not sell subscriptions and in which all articles are Open Access, e.g., BioMed Central, PLOS One, Nature Communications)
  • APCs for journals that do not offer a Green Open Access option that complies with RCUK’s Open Access policy

In most cases it is possible for RCUK funded authors to comply with its Open Access policy by making papers Green Open Access (i.e., uploading your Accepted Manuscript to Pure which will be made freely available after a specified embargo period).

The restriction in use of the block grant will commence from the 1st June 2017 onwards.”

About Data-Pass | Datapass

“The Data Preservation Alliance for the Social Sciences (Data-PASS) is a voluntary partnership of organizations created to archive, catalog and preserve data used for social science research. Examples of social science data include: opinion polls; voting records; surveys on family growth and income; social network data; government statistics and indices; and GIS data measuring human activity….”

PLOS Appoints Alison Mudditt Chief Executive Officer | The Official PLOS Blog

“PLOS is pleased to announce the appointment of Alison Mudditt as its Chief Executive Officer, effective June 19, 2017.

For the past six years Mudditt served as Director of University of California Press (UC Press) where she ushered in new strategies to lead the company into the digital age, including the innovative journal and monograph Open Access programs Collabra and Luminos.

Prior to UC Press, Mudditt was Executive Vice President at SAGE Publications, Inc., leading publishing programs across books, journals and digital platforms. Her 25 plus years in the publishing industry include leadership positions at Blackwell Publishers in Oxford, UK, and Taylor & Francis Inc., in Philadelphia, US. Mudditt received her Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Bath and her Masters in Business Administration from The Open University.”

The journal Sociologie du travail leaves ELSEVIER for Open Access on Revues.org – ejournals@cambridge

“The journal Sociologie du travail has terminated the contract it has had with Elsevier since 1999 and is moving to a fully digital form of Open Access on Revues.org.

Issue 59, Volume 1 of Sociologie du travail, entitled ‘Les syndicats face aux transformations du secteur public’, has just been published on Revues.org. The journal has also been given a makeover. This is a twofold turning point for the journal, which is both breaking with restricted access distribution on Elsevier and switching from print to digital. For Didier Demanière, author of this issue’s editorial, the change ‘signals a rupture with an international publisher contested for its exorbitant fees and positions the journal in the movement for open access to scientific articles’.”

Wiley partners with the British Journal of Surgery society to launch new open access journal | Wiley News Room – Press Releases, News, Events & Media

“Wiley has partnered with the British Journal of Surgery society to launch an exciting new open access title, BJS Open. Like its sister title, British Journal of Surgery (BJS), BJS Open will publish high-quality work on all aspects of general surgery and related topics.”

The Open Access Movement | ikangablog

“There’s so much good free stuff online (Khan Academy! Coursera! Caltech Authors!—the list goes on and on) that it’s easy to feel overwhelmed, perhaps even jaded by it all.

But it’s inspiring how people use these resources. I open CUNY Academic Works and look at the map and see where the downloads are coming from—Nebraska, California, and Ohio in the U.S.; Brisbane, Australia; Airai, Palau; Akershus, Norway. People are looking at papers about Italian architecture, media representations of Asian-Americans, rhetoric and violence.

I look at stories people have shared about how they have used the open access publications. There’s a nurse in an Australian aboriginal community who entertained herself in her remote location by accessing scholarship about Cormac McCarthy. There’s a high school debater in the U.S. who does her research in institutional repositories because she cannot access scholarship behind a paywall. There’s a scientist in Mexico whose investigation in climate change is aided by research shared by other scientists and offered free of charge.”

Passing a Campus Open Access Policy – OpenCon

“On March 31, Florida Gulf Coast University’s (FGCU) Faculty Senate passed an Open Access policy! The Open Access Archiving Policy ensures that future scholarly articles authored by FGCU faculty will be made freely available to the public by requiring faculty to deposit copies of their accepted manuscripts in the university’s repository, DigitalFGCU.”