A Fast-Track Route to Open Access | Unlocking Research

“By simply knowing what sort of manuscript has been uploaded much of the decision and archiving process can be automated. …

Agents therefore need only make one decision: identify the file version. …

Since launching Fast Track the average time to process a manuscript is 1-2 minutes. …”

A Fast-Track Route to Open Access | Unlocking Research

“By simply knowing what sort of manuscript has been uploaded much of the decision and archiving process can be automated. …

Agents therefore need only make one decision: identify the file version. …

Since launching Fast Track the average time to process a manuscript is 1-2 minutes. …”

Swiss consortium pledges 216,000 Eur to DOAJ and SHERPA/RoMEO – News Service

“We are delighted to announce that the Consortium of Swiss Academic Libraries, comprising sixteen libraries and the Swiss National Science Foundation, is the third national consortium to commit to the SCOSS initiative.

swissuniversities, the Rectors’ Conference of Swiss Higher Education Institutions, contributes approximately 50% of the total costs in the framework of the Swiss National Strategy for Open Access….”

Swiss consortium pledges 216,000 Eur to DOAJ and SHERPA/RoMEO – News Service

“We are delighted to announce that the Consortium of Swiss Academic Libraries, comprising sixteen libraries and the Swiss National Science Foundation, is the third national consortium to commit to the SCOSS initiative.

swissuniversities, the Rectors’ Conference of Swiss Higher Education Institutions, contributes approximately 50% of the total costs in the framework of the Swiss National Strategy for Open Access….”

Better than the German Wiley DEAL? The Couperin Consortium reaches a price reduction of more than 13% over four years in an agreement with Elsevier » scidecode

For some, this may seem better than the Wiley Deal in Germany: French universities and research institutions have agreed in principle, through their Couperin consortium, to renew their national licence with Elsevier. In a letter sent on April 11 to Elsevier by Lise Dumasy, president of Couperin, details of the agreement, which is valid for 4 years, effective as of January 1 this year, are revealed.

With this agreement, French universities and research institutions will have access to the publisher’s „Freedom complete edition“ journal bundle including e.g. The Lancet and Cell Press. However, the consortium does not guarantee to the publisher that all its members will adhere to the national licence….

Here are the main points:

  • Most surprising: This agreement provides for a gradual 13.3% reduction in license costs over 4 years -5% in 2019, -4% in 2020, -3% in 2021 and -2% in 2022, in total -13.305% over four years.
  • There is 25% discount on article processing charges (APC). There will also be a compensatory clause if these APCs increase by more than 3.5%. Excluded from this discount are – as I understand it – only the society journals, e.g. The Lancet and the Cell Press titles. Included are all Open Access journals and hybrid journals. The 3.5% threshold refers to annual price increases.
  • Regarding Green Open Access the agreement allows automatic access 12 months after formal publication to the „accepted author manuscript“ (AAM) or post print directly on Elsevier’s service Sciencedirect. After 24 months the pdf file of this manuscript will be deposited on the HAL platform (the CNRS Open Access Repository). The license to make AAMs available is more restrictive than most Creative Commons licenses. It allows reading, downloading, printing, translating, text & data mining but does not allow redistribution or re-use (neither commercial or non-commercial)….”

Norway and Elsevier meet a nine million Euro agreement including a Gold Open Access clause » scidecode

“The Norwegian consortium for higher education and research and the publishing house Elsevier agreed two days ago to a national license. This provides Norwegian researchers not only access to articles published in Elsevier’s journals (including the society journals as The Lancet or CELL Press) but also the opportunity to publish their results Open Access. Seven universities and 39 research institutions will benefit from the two-year agreement….

In similar agreements, e.g. in Finland, an Open Access publication was by far not allowed in all Elsevier journals. But according to Openaccess.no the contract covers up to 90 percent of the articles published by scientists from members of the consortium. Only the society journals (about 400 in total) will be excluded….

Just as with the Wiley DEAL in Germany, this agreement also strengthens the allegedly unpopular Hybrid Open Access, which was even disallowed by Plan S. The agreement with Elsevier in France is different and should strengthen Green Open Access.”

Elsevier’s Norway U-turn seen as attempt to stem cancellations | Times Higher Education (THE)

“Some believe commercial pressure could finally be pushing the publisher to change how it deals with universities….

Elsevier’s surprise decision to strike a deal with Norwegian universities has been seen by some as a significant change of direction in response to years of negative headlines about cancelled contracts, which in one case hit its parent company’s share price.

 

While the “publish and read” contract does not go as far as some open access campaigners would like, and it excludes publication in some well-known journals such as Cell and The Lancet, it is seen as a significant departure from the publisher’s previous deals….”

Open Innovation in OpenAIRE | Activities

“The background: OpenAIRE is a platform funded and supported by European Commission with the mission to shift scholarly communication towards openness and transparency and facilitate innovative ways to communicate and monitor research. The long term vision of OpenAIRE is to transform society through validated scientific knowledge allowing citizens, educators, funders, civil servants and industry to find ways to make science useful and comprehensive.

Open Innovation: OpenAIRE launches within the framework of the European Commission’s Horizon 2020 programme, its Open Innovation programme to discover, support and fund innovative ideas and implementations of software in the Open Science domain. This is achieved by the mingle of external and internal ideas that will lead to the co-creation of fresh business ideas and the formation of an innovation ecosystem with would-be-entrepreneurs, startups and SMEs, closely related to OpenAIRE. The Open Innovation programme will select innovative projects in the field of Open Science to develop products and services linked to scholarly works, repositories, data management, OpenAIRE infrastructure and OpenAIRE services. Furthermore, ideas that make use of current assets available within OpenAIRE and create new services for the Open Science ecosystem (and EOSC) are welcome!

The challenges: Through this open call, OpenAIRE calls young innovators and SMEs to work on one of the following three challenges, so as to improve or to build on the current infrastructure, by picking up the one that fits best with your experience, skills, and motivation….”

Proposals now invited for FORCE2019 | FORCE11

The program committee for the FORCE2019 meeting in Edinburgh (October 15 – 17) now invites proposals for talks, posters, panels, and workshops to be submitted. The deadline for submissions is June 2, 2019.

The FORCE11 annual conference is a different kind of meeting, where stakeholders come together for an open discussion, on an even playing field, to talk about changing the ways scholarly and scientific information is communicated, shared and used. Researchers, publishers, librarians, computer scientists, informaticians, funders, educators, citizens, and others attend the FORCE11 meeting with a view to supporting the realisation of promising new ideas and identifying new potential collaborators….”

Rein in the four horsemen of irreproducibility

Finally, and most importantly, those who fund research have become more concerned, and more strict. They have introduced requirements that data and scripts be made open and methods be described fully.

I anticipate that these forces will soon gain the upper hand, and the four horsemen might finally be slain.”

OAI11 – CERN-UNIGE Workshop on Innovations in Scholarly Communication (19-21 June 2019) · Indico

How can editors, researchers, libraries, publishers and funders collaborate to flip existing journals to open access? In the next few years, the transition of subscription/hybrid journals to full open access will accelerate. Plan S has formulated a commitment that this has to seriously begin in 2020. This worries all stakeholders in scholarly communication for different reasons. We will explore different proven approaches and more specifically discuss the various steps in the transition to Fair Open Access.”

The Wikipedia Library/1Lib1Ref/Lessons/2019 – Meta

The January [2019] #1Lib1Ref campaign saw an energy exhibited by participants that was infectious. The campaign saw major additions, new entrants and a new sense of competition between languages and institutions. In this iteration #1Lib1Ref reached record highs and saw extensive participation from emerging communities and languages. For the first time the French Wikipedia took the lead with over 33% of the total number of contributions made during the campaign. Based on these results, we anticipate that #1Lib1Ref has the potential of supporting outreach in diverse communities….”