Supporting Open Access Monographs: Ingredients for a Prototype? – University of Westminster Press blog

“Calls to support public publishing infrastructure, ‘new’ ‘business’ models and alternative approaches to monograph publishing are popular. With the work of COPIM progressing well and building on established ventures like the Scholar-Led consortium, OBP and OLH (in journals) here are some thoughts about what a ambitious pilot scheme could look like. Caveats abound. Agreement between parties, governance and practicalities would be difficult in context. But could it be useful to think of values in the sector and consider the merits of a carrot- rather than stick-based approach? 

I have called it COUL after a long search for an upbeat acronym. 

Collective Open University Library – ­UK (Monographs Publishing) ….”

Open Publishing Festival 2020: Open Infrastructure principles for third party involvement – YouTube

“In the past years, principles around open scholarly infrastructure have been proposed to provide guidance on development and procurement of services, among others by SPARC NA. As a next step, in the Netherlands, a set of guidelines, now under open consultation, will inform future terms and conditions for collaborations with third parties on research information.

These guiding principles address: – ownership of (meta)data – enduring access – trusted and transparent provenance – open collaboration with the market – interoperability – community-owned governance But how do these resonate with service providers? If the recent result of the Dutch negotiations with Elsevier shows anything, it is that there are multiple interpretations as to what collaboration on open science infrastructure means. In this session, we intend to have a discussion with open science specialists and providers of open scholarly infrastructure. Do for-profit and non-profit providers have different interests in this regard? Will these principle-based collaborations fit the goals of open science? Organized by Bianca Kramer, Jeroen Bosman, Jeroen Sondervan (Utrecht University Library).”

Scientific Authors in a Changing World of Scholarly Communication: What Does the Future Hold?

Abstract:  Scholarly communication in science, technology and medicine has been organized around journal-based scientific publishing for the past 350 years. Scientific publishing has unique business models and includes stakeholders with conflicting interests – publishers, funders, libraries, and scholars who create, curate, and consume the literature. Massive growth and change in scholarly communication, coinciding with digitalization, have amplified stresses inherent in traditional scientific publishing as evidenced by overwhelmed editors and reviewers, increased retraction rates, emergence of pseudo-journals, strained library budgets, and debates about the metrics of academic recognition for scholarly achievements. Simultaneously, several open access models are gaining traction and online technologies offer opportunities to augment traditional tasks of scientific publishing, develop integrated discovery services, and establish global and equitable scholarly communication through crowdsourcing, software development, big data management and machine learning. These rapidly evolving developments raise financial, legal and ethical dilemmas that require solutions while successful strategies are difficult to predict. Key challenges and trends are reviewed from the authors’ perspective about how to engage the scholarly community in this multifaceted process.

 

The University of Tsukuba and F1000 Research lead the way in Open Science with first open research publishing gateway to publish in Japanese – F1000 Blogs

“Today, the University of Tsukuba has announced that it has signed a contract with F1000 Research Ltd to develop the first open research publishing gateway that will enable researchers to publish in either English or Japanese.

Not only will the publishing gateway make it simple for authors affiliated with the University of Tsukuba to publish any research or data they wish to share rapidly, openly and transparently, but it will also enable those studying the humanities and social sciences to choose whether to publish in English or in Japanese.

Indeed, English holds a preeminent position as the “lingua franca” in international scientific communication, despite the majority of the world’s scholars not possessing English as their first language. This does not necessarily mean, however, that studies published in other languages are of less value or quality.

This forward-thinking publishing approach means that researchers specializing in fields such as humanities and social sciences will be able to publish in an international journal but choose which language they feel most comfortable writing in, as well as what befits their field of study the most.

Indeed, the humanities and social sciences fields are where publishing in a regional language would enable more profound understanding and knowledge sharing, given these academic disciplines are often dedicated to the study of philosophy, history, literature, society, law, economy, and so on of a specific culture. Japanese language research articles will include abstracts and metadata in both Japanese and English, and will be indexed in relevant bibliographic databases in both English and Japanese….”

The University of Tsukuba and F1000 Research lead the way in Open Science with first open research publishing gateway to publish in Japanese – F1000 Blogs

“Today, the University of Tsukuba has announced that it has signed a contract with F1000 Research Ltd to develop the first open research publishing gateway that will enable researchers to publish in either English or Japanese.

Not only will the publishing gateway make it simple for authors affiliated with the University of Tsukuba to publish any research or data they wish to share rapidly, openly and transparently, but it will also enable those studying the humanities and social sciences to choose whether to publish in English or in Japanese.

Indeed, English holds a preeminent position as the “lingua franca” in international scientific communication, despite the majority of the world’s scholars not possessing English as their first language. This does not necessarily mean, however, that studies published in other languages are of less value or quality.

This forward-thinking publishing approach means that researchers specializing in fields such as humanities and social sciences will be able to publish in an international journal but choose which language they feel most comfortable writing in, as well as what befits their field of study the most.

Indeed, the humanities and social sciences fields are where publishing in a regional language would enable more profound understanding and knowledge sharing, given these academic disciplines are often dedicated to the study of philosophy, history, literature, society, law, economy, and so on of a specific culture. Japanese language research articles will include abstracts and metadata in both Japanese and English, and will be indexed in relevant bibliographic databases in both English and Japanese….”

CC Search Celebrates Its First Birthday!

At the end of April, CC Search officially celebrated its first birthday! After releasing the search tool last year on April 30, we eagerly watched as it was put to use. Now, with a year behind us and over 2.8 million users across 230 countries and territories, we’re gathering and examining search data to better … Read More “CC Search Celebrates Its First Birthday!”
The post CC Search Celebrates Its First Birthday! appeared first on Creative Commons.

CC Search Celebrates Its First Birthday!

At the end of April, CC Search officially celebrated its first birthday! After releasing the search tool last year on April 30, we eagerly watched as it was put to use. Now, with a year behind us and over 2.8 million users across 230 countries and territories, we’re gathering and examining search data to better … Read More “CC Search Celebrates Its First Birthday!”
The post CC Search Celebrates Its First Birthday! appeared first on Creative Commons.

Open letter from the European Medicines Agency

“Our activities in relation to COVID-19 deserve the highest possible level of transparency and, in keeping with our commitment, the Agency will take appropriate action to share information publicly. We are currently discussing how to enhance the level of transparency for COVID-19 procedures, including the possibility of rapidly publishing clinical data for these products. The need for rapid evaluation during the current emergency will require us to depart from our usual procedures. In some cases, we will be evaluating evidence as it emerges (i.e. ‘rolling review’) and putting information in the public domain in these circumstances will be subject to additional challenges which we are currently looking to address….

Inevitably, this disruption [Brexit] required the Agency to shift all its focus to core activities that are essential for public health. Regrettably, our efforts to publish clinical data had to be put on hold in these very trying circumstances. 

In view of this and the extra effort needed to deal with COVID-19 related activities, I can’t yet commit

to reinitiate all activities related to clinical data publishing for medicines evaluated by the Agency.

However, as stated above, COVID-19 related medicines deserve special consideration because of the

overriding public interest and the need to support the international research community and foster the

collaborative effort. Further information on the concrete proposals to increase transparency of COVID19 related activities will be communicated once agreed within EMA and the EU Regulatory Network….”

Open letter from the European Medicines Agency

“Our activities in relation to COVID-19 deserve the highest possible level of transparency and, in keeping with our commitment, the Agency will take appropriate action to share information publicly. We are currently discussing how to enhance the level of transparency for COVID-19 procedures, including the possibility of rapidly publishing clinical data for these products. The need for rapid evaluation during the current emergency will require us to depart from our usual procedures. In some cases, we will be evaluating evidence as it emerges (i.e. ‘rolling review’) and putting information in the public domain in these circumstances will be subject to additional challenges which we are currently looking to address….

Inevitably, this disruption [Brexit] required the Agency to shift all its focus to core activities that are essential for public health. Regrettably, our efforts to publish clinical data had to be put on hold in these very trying circumstances. 

In view of this and the extra effort needed to deal with COVID-19 related activities, I can’t yet commit

to reinitiate all activities related to clinical data publishing for medicines evaluated by the Agency.

However, as stated above, COVID-19 related medicines deserve special consideration because of the

overriding public interest and the need to support the international research community and foster the

collaborative effort. Further information on the concrete proposals to increase transparency of COVID19 related activities will be communicated once agreed within EMA and the EU Regulatory Network….”

HighWire at 25: Todd McGee looks back – Highwire Press

“Last week saw HighWire’s 25th anniversary, a huge milestone in our history. Founded by Stanford University during the early days of the web, HighWire pioneered the online revolution in scholarly publishing.

Since then, our world has transformed beyond recognition and our industry is facing disruption like never before. In the last year, we’ve all had to come to grips with the “new normal”, exploring new ways of doing, sharing and publishing science and research more rapidly and more collaboratively than ever before. 

In this blog post, Todd McGee, Vice President of Research, Development and Operations at HighWire, gives us some insight into the early days of HighWire and how he got involved. …”

HighWire at 25: Todd McGee looks back – Highwire Press

“Last week saw HighWire’s 25th anniversary, a huge milestone in our history. Founded by Stanford University during the early days of the web, HighWire pioneered the online revolution in scholarly publishing.

Since then, our world has transformed beyond recognition and our industry is facing disruption like never before. In the last year, we’ve all had to come to grips with the “new normal”, exploring new ways of doing, sharing and publishing science and research more rapidly and more collaboratively than ever before. 

In this blog post, Todd McGee, Vice President of Research, Development and Operations at HighWire, gives us some insight into the early days of HighWire and how he got involved. …”

Campus Activated Subscriber Access (CASA) – Highwire Press

“HighWire and Google co-developed CASA (Campus Activated Subscriber Access) as an authentication enhancement that improves the authentication for off-campus users of Google Scholar.  CASA is free and is automatically enabled for all HighWire-hosted Journals that are indexed in Google Scholar.

How does it work?

When a user is on-campus, they often connect to a University network. When connected, if they visit Google Scholar, Google automatically creates an affiliation between that user and their institution.  This affiliation allows Google Scholar to record that the user has subscription privileges granted by that institution. With Google CASA, this same seamless authentication follows the user when they take their device to any off-campus location.   Once the affiliation is created, it grants them immediate access to the articles and Journals that their institution subscribes to even when the user is off campus….”

Campus Activated Subscriber Access (CASA) – Highwire Press

“HighWire and Google co-developed CASA (Campus Activated Subscriber Access) as an authentication enhancement that improves the authentication for off-campus users of Google Scholar.  CASA is free and is automatically enabled for all HighWire-hosted Journals that are indexed in Google Scholar.

How does it work?

When a user is on-campus, they often connect to a University network. When connected, if they visit Google Scholar, Google automatically creates an affiliation between that user and their institution.  This affiliation allows Google Scholar to record that the user has subscription privileges granted by that institution. With Google CASA, this same seamless authentication follows the user when they take their device to any off-campus location.   Once the affiliation is created, it grants them immediate access to the articles and Journals that their institution subscribes to even when the user is off campus….”

Is it Safe to Use? – Guidelines for re-using images from Wiki sites — Naomi Korn Associates

“When searching for images for commercial use we often turn to Wiki sites as first port of call, but are all the images safe to use for commercial purposes?  Not everything posted in the Commons or Media sites or used on a Wiki page is in fact open access. Some images (particularly in WikiPedia), are there with an explanation that they are used on the site because they are all over the web and nothing else could be found or the licence holder could not be found.  Not everything that says it is “Public Domain” or “Creative Commons 0” actually is, depending on where you live.

It is easy to scroll down to the rights section below the image, and open the blue “More Info” button to check what kind of licence the image carries. There are various types of “CC” licence and the letters after CC tell you whether any restrictions apply. Importantly, you may not be allowed to change the photo (eg crop it or incorporate it into another work (ND) or you may not be allowed to use it commercially (NC). Explanations for the various letter codes can be found here https://creativecommons.org/licenses/.

The issues I will consider fall roughly into two categories: works of art and contemporary photographs of landscapes and architecture. …”