2nd UN Open Science Conference – International Science Council

In the 2nd Open Science Conference, From Tackling the Pandemic to Addressing Climate Change, policymakers, main IGO actors, librarians, publishers and research practitioners will engage in a public dialogue focusing on what Open Science has learned from COVID-19 and how this can be applied into actions addressing the global climate crisis, at the interface of science, technology, policy and research. 

Open science: la conoscenza come bene comune – Padovanews

The Theological Faculty of Triveneto has designed the Open science project “Knowledge as a common good”, which will be realized in the between 2021 and 2023 thanks to the contribution of 150,000 EUR allocated by the Cassa di Risparmio di Padova and Rovigo Foundation.

The project is divided into three sections:
1. Open Data: the Theological Faculty of the Triveneto and its Archives;
2. Open Access: dissemination and exchange of the journal published by the faculty, Studia patavina;
3. Open Education Resources: the Faculty’s library: new services

Osma me?unarodna konferencija o znanstvenoj komunikaciji u kontekstu otvorene znanosti PUBMET2021 – Profitiraj.hr

The Eighth International Conference on Scientific Communication in the Context of Open Science PUBMET2021 continues a series of very successful conferences on scientific communication organized by the University of Zadar, the Croatian Association for Scientific Communication – ZNAK, the University of Zagreb and the Ru?er Boškovi? Institute. The conference will be held from 15 to 17 September 2021 under the auspices of the Ministry of Science and Education, OpenAIRE, the European Association of Science Editors (EASE) and SPARC Europe.

COAR releases resource types vocabulary version 3.0 for repositories with new look and feel – COAR

“We are pleased to announce the release of version 3.0 of the resource types vocabulary. Since 2015, three COAR Controlled Vocabularies have been developed and are maintained by the Controlled Vocabulary Editorial Board: Resource types, access rights and version types.  These vocabularies have a new look and are now being managed using the iQvoc platform, hosted by the University of Vienna Library.

Using controlled vocabularies enables repositories to be consistent in describing their resources, helps with search and discovery of content, and allows machine readability for interoperability. The COAR vocabularies are available in several languages, supporting multilingualism across repositories. They also play a key role in making semantic artifacts and repositories compliant with the FAIR Principles, in particular when it comes to findability and interoperability….”

National Library’s plan to digitise and preserve books draws wide support from New Zealand civil society organisations – Tohatoha

“Claims that the National Library’s recently announced plan to send 600,000 books overseas to be digitised is equivalent to ‘internet piracy’ are unfounded, says a group of New Zealand civil society organisations supportive of the initiative.

In a statement from the Department of Internal Affairs last week, Te Puna M?tauranga o Aotearoa National Library announced it had reached an historic agreement where all books left at the end of the Overseas Published Collections (OPC) review process will be donated to the Internet Archive so they can digitise and preserve them.

Several New Zealand associations and organisations, including Internet New Zealand, Museums Aotearoa, the New Zealand Open Source Society and Tohatoha Aotearoa Commons, are backing the National Library’s plan, saying that the initiative will help ensure future access for New Zealanders to a greater range of publications.

Mandy Henk, CEO of Tohatoha and a librarian herself, said that claims that the Internet Archive’s digitisation service is illegal – made this week by several New Zealand publishing organisations – are not true….”

Institutional Repository Librarian Job Opening in Morgantown, West Virginia – ALA JobLIST | Jobs in Library & Information Science & Technology

“The Knowledge Access & Resource Management Department in Libraries at West Virginia University is seeking applications for an Institutional Repository Librarian. The Institutional Repository Librarian is responsible for managing the West Virginia University Institutional Repository and related technologies, with a focus on metadata to facilitate discovery, acquisition, and assessment of collections, and identity management to increase the impact of WVU’s intellectual output. Collaborating with institutional stakeholders to acquire and promote the University’s digital and open scholarship, this position provides customer service and outreach to West Virginia University faculty, staff, students, and research affiliates, evaluates and implements third party integrations such as Altmetrics, and serves as workflow manager for projects within and across Scholarly Communications and the KARM Department. The Institutional Repository Librarian reports to the Head of Metadata Services in KARM….”

Library launches future with FOLIO | Cornell University Library

“At the start of July, Cornell University Library made a giant leap to the future by implementing an innovative integrated library system (ILS) called FOLIO, becoming the first large research library in the world to migrate to the platform. 

Since 2016, Cornell University Library has been collaborating with institutions around the world to develop the new ILS, which is a complex suite of software for running services and operations—from ordering, paying for, cataloging, and lending out materials to analyzing resource use across physical, digital, local, and remote collections. An acronym for “The Future of Libraries Is Open,” FOLIO is envisioned as a sustainable, community-driven alternative to proprietary ILS products that are costly to purchase and maintain and are subject to vendor control. 

The open source and collaborative nature of FOLIO aligns with Cornell University Library’s commitment to open access and the wide sharing of knowledge …”

Which aspects of the Open Science agenda are most relevant to scientometric research and publishing? An opinion paper | Quantitative Science Studies | MIT Press

Abstract:  Open Science is an umbrella term that encompasses many recommendations for possible changes in research practices, management, and publishing with the objective to increase transparency and accessibility. This has become an important science policy issue that all disciplines should consider. Many Open Science recommendations may be valuable for the further development of research and publishing, but not all are relevant to all fields. This opinion paper considers the aspects of Open Science that are most relevant for scientometricians, discussing how they can be usefully applied.

 

In the Netherlands: The 100% open access ambition

[Undated] “The Dutch government is of the opinion that publicly funded research should be freely accessible. This was the position outlined by State Secretary Sander Dekker in a letter (in Dutch) to the Dutch House of Representatives already in November 2013. He was deliberately opting for the golden route. He aimed to have 60 percent of Dutch academic publication available through open access within five years (2019) and 100 percent within ten years (2024). If not enough progress is made, proposals will follow in 2016 to make open access publication mandatory.

In 2016, the Amsterdam Call for Action on Open Science was drawn up at an Open Science meeting organized by the Dutch Presidency of the Council of the European Union on 4 and 5 April 2016 in Amsterdam. The ambition of 100% open access was further strengthened and the date was also adjusted to 100% open access at the end of 2020. The results and actions are formulated in the Amsterdam Call for Action on Open Science. See the summary and comments on the Call for Action.

The government sets the priotity for the golden route because this is most sustainable in the long term. In addition, the publishers’ business model will change and this route provides the best guarantee that publications are immediately available. The green route often means lengthy embargo periods. …”

Why Do We Need to Change Research Evaluation Systems? — Observatory | Institute for the Future of Education

“Can we break out of this vicious cycle? Are there alternatives? Yes, there are. For some years now, various movements worldwide have sought to change the system for evaluating research. In 2012, the “San Francisco Declaration” proposed eliminating metrics based on the impact factor. There was also the Charte de la désexcellence  (“Letter of Dis-Excellence”) mentioned above. In 2015, a group of academicians signed the Leiden Manifesto, which warned of the “widespread misuse of indicators in evaluating scientific performance.” Since 2013, the group Science in Transition has sought to reform the science evaluation system. Finally, since 2016, the Collectiu InDocentia, created at the University of Valencia (Spain), has also been doing its part. …”

LIBER 2021 Session #5: How Can Open Infrastructures Support the Role of Research Libraries? – YouTube

“Please find here the recording of the LIBER 2021 Session #5: How Can Open Infrastructures Support the Role of Research Libraries? The slides can be accessed through the following link: https://zenodo.org/record/5044765#.YO…

Description: In the first presentation, Fidan Limani explores the integration of scholarly artifacts from the domain of economics using Knowledge Graphs (KG). An initial version of the KG is presented and discussed, all the while keeping a library perspective on the process. Use cases enabled by this approach are also deliberated on, such as opportunities for researchers to interact with multiple facets of a research endeavour (in terms of research deliverables), cases that involve resource complementarity, or those that involve certain research deliverables across providers or collection origin. A final item to discuss includes the methodology used to design, develop, and maintain the current KG and its future extension. In the second presentation, James MacGregor, Niels Stern, Silvio Peroni and Joanna Ball discuss the benefits of Open Infrastructure for libraries. Libraries benefit from Open Infrastructure, including projects such as the Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB), OAPEN, OpenCitations, and Open Journal Systems (OJS), by receiving access to free content and services that help in establishing quality and discoverability. However, they offer libraries much more than just cost-free alternatives to commercial infrastructures. They are also Open in the sense that they have community-based governance models and opportunities for community input into their future developments and directions. In this presentation , we will hear from three Open Infrastructures currently supported by the SCOSS program – discussing how they involve contributing libraries in their governance. In the third and final presentation, Emilie Blotière and Tiziana Lombardo address two services provided by OPERAS and funded by the European Commission – the Research for Society service, under the COESO project (Swafs call) and the Discovery platform for Social Science and Humanities resources (data and publications, profiles and projects), under the TRIPLE project (INFRAEOSC call). The talk will include an introduction of OPERAS and the two services, a discussion on the interoperability and complementarity between these platforms, and an explanation on how the complementarity facilitates institutional funding….”

IBM, MIT and Harvard release DARPA “Common Sense AI” dataset at ICML 2021 | IBM Research Blog

“Before we can build machines that make decisions based on common sense, the AI powering those machines must be capable of more than simply finding patterns in data. It must also consider the intentions, beliefs, and desires of others that people use to intuitively make decisions.

At the 2021 International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), we are releasing a new dataset for benchmarking AI intuition, along with two machine learning models representing different approaches to the problem. The research has been done with our colleagues at MIT and Harvard University to accelerate the development of AI that exhibits common sense. These tools rely on testing techniques that psychologists use to study the behavior of infants….”